Reprinted and adapted by permission from Diana DeLugan 
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"Rebel Flag" also known as the "Dixie Flag" and the "Southern Cross"
[The following article was originally published at the Arizona History Blog on August 8, 2014]

The words "Civil War" evoke images of Gettysburg, the clash between the North and South in a tangle of grey and blue uniforms. In school, we learned that southern states seceded from the Union. But did you know that for short time Arizona was part of the Confederate States?

According to the 2014 Arizona History timeline at the Arizona Governor's website, Arizona became part of the Confederacy in 1862. The website further reports the "Battle at Picacho Pass, near Casa Grande[, Arizona] is considered the westernmost battle of the Civil War.." If the Battle at Picacho Pass was the westernmost battle, how far south did the Confederacy in Arizona? According to a 1879 San Francisco Bulletin correspondent report, the answer is Tubac. 

"In 1862, and this is not known to many, a company of so-called Confederate soldiers took possession of Tubac, (and I think there was a Confederate garrison at Tucson for a while) and raised the flag of the de facto government which had its headquarters in Richmond. This company of men made it warm for the Apaches, under the wily and brave Cochise, and killed a good many of them. During the latter part of 1862, a regiment of Union soldiers arrived at Tucson (and the present Mayor of Tucson, now worth $100,000, was an officer in said regiment,) and the Confederate garrison at Tubac was at once abandoned. Upon the departure of these troops, what people had located also departed, and Tubac was again left without an inhabitant, the overland stages and all other travel had been drawn off, grass had grown up in the streets, and all of the adobe houses crumbled into ruins."

Although differing accounts exist regarding if or when the town of Tubac was abandoned, one thing is certain, its' Confederate history will not be forgotten. 

For more information regarding the Confederacy in Arizona visit:
http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/picachopeak.html

Sources:

Arizona Sentinel, March 22, 1879
AZgovernor.gov

Flag: By William Porcher Miles (1822-1899) (Vector graphics image by Crotalus horridus)  This vector image was created with Inkscape. (SVG adapted from this image) Wikimedia Commons. PD-US.

(c) 2014-2017 Diana DeLugan All rights reserved.
 
 
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Official blog of TheOteros.com where Arizona history is celebrated and made.

By Diana DeLugan

WELCOME
Bienvenidos to the new Otero Family History Blog where we will discuss all things related to the Otero Family of Tubac. If you have a question about Otero Family History, let me know. I'll be glad to research your question and publish the answer here so that everyone interested in this subject can benefit from your question. 

Since research began in 2009, it became quickly apparent that inconsistencies and errors existed in previously published media regarding Otero family history. When news has been reported about a subject for centuries, it is not uncommon for facts to be embellished or reported incorrectly due to lack of available information or misconstrued facts due to lost or destroyed documentation caused by the passage of time. This post is the first of what will be an ongoing effort to accurately report the history of the Oteros of Tubac, Arizona and learn more about southern Arizona's pioneer past. All mediums including print and video will be reviewed.  The purpose of this inquiry is not to criticize. Rather, it is to help educate and set the record straight so that anyone interested in Otero Family History and Southern Arizona History can become more informed about Arizona's pioneer past. 
WHY DOES THIS MATTER
The Otero family is proud of Don Torivio de Otero's legacy as Arizona's first European private owner of land, first private landowner to build an irrigation system and the first documented lay teacher during Hispanic Arizona periods. 

Like other Hispanic Arizona families, the Otero family survived drought and physical and legal attacks against its' land. Struggles endured by Hispanics in the American southwest are often forgotten, or voices muted as being inconsistent with modern perspectives related to Arizona history. The Otero family is an integral part of Arizona's Hispanic past. It is one of many important Hispanic families that helped make Arizona what it is today. A cursory look at Arizona's architecture, art, and street names of any Arizona city or town reflect remnants of our Spanish and Mexican past. The Otero Family History Blog celebrates our collective Arizona pioneer past.


History has been kind to the Otero Family of Tubac. Over the centuries, many notable Otero descendants have been memorialized in writing like Don Torivio de Otero, Atanacio Otero, Sabino Otero, Teofilo Otero, and Sister Clara (Gabriella) Otero. However, there is much more history to be discussed and celebrated.


HOW CAN YOU HELP
Truth is our destination. If you have any information to help clarify a historical reference, person, or event related to southern Arizona History or Otero Family History, please contact us. Thank you in advance for your interest in Otero Family History. Remember, your comments are encouraged and always welcomed.


Image credit: (c) 2013 Diana DeLugan All rights reserved. Photo of "Where History Lives On" Arch at Tubac Golf Resort & Spa, former location of Otero Ranch. (c) 2017 Diana Delugan. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without written permission.